1

What are rules of parallelism for using an infinitive and preposition after an 'and' or 'but' conjunction?

I want to fight for them and to bring those changes in the life of people.

Or

I want to fight for them and to fight to bring those changes in the life of people.

Or

I want to fight for them and bring those changes in the life of people.

3
  • 1
    Although to bring change is possible, the usual expression is to bring about change/s dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/… Commented Jan 22, 2021 at 23:07
  • "to bring change" sounds natural to my ears. "To bring changes" doesn't.
    – user110685
    Commented Jan 22, 2021 at 23:12
  • 1
    I want to fight for people and bring changes to their lives.
    – Lambie
    Commented Apr 1, 2021 at 15:16

2 Answers 2

0

They are grammatical but they have slightly different meanings. In the first two, the conjunction is connecting two infinitive verb phrases, so whichever verbs are first will be interpreted as parallel actions. In the first sentence, the parallel infinitives are "to bring" and "to fight" in

"I want to fight for them and to bring those changes in the life of people."

The meaning is roughly that "fighting" and "bringing" are two separate but parallel actions that you want to do. In the second sentence, you have "to fight" in parallel with "to fight" on both sides of the "and"

"Or I want to fight for them and to fight to bring those changes in the life of people."

Using "fight" twice in parallel like this implies that the two instances of fighting, i.e. "to fight for them" and "to fight to bring..." entail two different sets of actions.

The third sentence is a little different

"I want to fight for them and bring those changes in the life of people."

the stuff after the "and" isn't infinitive any more, so the sentence isn't parallel infinitives anymore, so it gets interpreted differently. I can think of two grammatical ways to parse it; the most natural interpretation would that "to fight for them and bring those changes in the life of people" is an infinitive phrase, i.e. the whole phrase is treated as an infinitive. C.f. Wikipedia's example "I want to tell you that Brett Favre is going to get married." This phrasing suggests that bringing about changes is a consequence of fighting, which is probably what you want to imply. I would use this phrasing in my own writing.

The other (much less natural but still grammatical) way to parse this sentence is with the phrases "want to fight for them" and "bring those changes..." are in parallel, thus you are simultaneously saying "I want to fight for them." and "I bring those changes..." This is grammatically parallel but the ideas in each clause aren't really parallels, so it's reasonable to expect anyone reading that to interpret it the first way instead.


You should also note that the phrase should be "lives of people" not "life of people", since multiple people don't all have the same life.

0

With no context, and without getting too pedantic, I simply understand each of the original three sentences to mean:
I want to fight to bring those changes to the lives of the people.

To bring those changes to the lives of the people is a pretty long adverbial infinitive phrase that modifies another infinitive, "to fight", to explain the "type of fighting." So, if there were more than one type of fighting being discussed, due to the length of that adverbial infinitive phrase, a new sentence should be created for clarity.

OR, add a conjunction to stop to bring from modifying to fight, or swap the placement of the infinitives, as such:
I want to fight and to bring those changes to the lives of the people.
I want to bring those changes to the lives of the people and to fight.

"What kind of fighting" is left unknown.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .