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Could you help me to understand, there are the same meaning in these examples? Are all of them idiomatic? Is there no difference?

I would like to meet you

at this time tomorrow.

at this same time tomorrow.

at the same time tomorrow.

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  • 2
    The second is not idiomatic. Commented Jan 24, 2021 at 13:37

2 Answers 2

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  1. I would like to meet you at this time tomorrow.

This is correct. It means you want to meet the person again at the current time. For example, if you met at 2PM, talked for an hour, and said this, you would want to meet them at 3PM tomorrow.

  1. I would like to meet you at this same time tomorrow.

This can be correct, but is unusual. It implies that you want to meet the person at the same time you met them today, which is also the current time. This really only makes sense if it is said to someone upon meeting them.

  1. I would like to meet you at the same time tomorrow.

This is correct, and it means you are meeting someone at the same time you met them today, which is not the current time. If you meet someone at 2PM, talk for an hour, and say this, it means you want to meet again at 2PM tomorrow.

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  • I disagree with your assessment of #2 as unusual and limited to only "upon meeting" someone. The addition of the word "same" to "this time tomorrow" serves to emphasize the time. Semantically, all three are equivalent, but emphasize different aspects of the statement. If someone says to me that they want to meet me "at this same time tomorrow," I know that I had better not be late.
    – RobJarvis
    Commented Jun 9, 2021 at 18:31
  • I agree that #2 is not unusual, but "this" still implies current time like #1. So it's most likely to be used "upon meeting" someone, or perhaps at the end of the same meeting, but would not likely be used later in the day after a meeting had concluded.
    – Grunthos
    Commented Dec 13, 2021 at 19:48
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All three are correct.

I am a native speaker of English.

I have heard native English speakers use all of them.

  1. I would like to meet you at this time tomorrow.
  2. I would like to meet you at this same time tomorrow.
  3. I would like to meet you at the same time tomorrow.

The only discernible difference is that #1 ("at this time") can be used while pointing to a piece of paper.

Examples #2 and #3 indicate that we are supposed to meet tommarrow at the same time that we met today.

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