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For example:

"Just so you know, I'll be at the beach."

I think it's an adverb clause but I'm not sure.

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Yes, it's an adverbial clause.

I will be at the beach is a main clause. A clause that is not a main clause is an adverbial clause.

AFTER EDIT

You should not also get confused between noun cluase, adjective clause, and adverb clause. (I don't like personally the expression of "subordinate clause" but do like the specific clause name.)

(That S + V ) is (that S + V): Both of them are noun clause.

Noun(who/that/which + V) is (that S + V): 1st cluase is a relative clause(as adjective) and 2nd clause is a noun clause(as complement)

[Noun(who/that/which + V) is (that S + V)] = main clause(as a whole) = S + V +C

There is no adverb clause in the sentence structure above.

If there is a main clause, the other clause is an adverbial clause.

You should know that CLAUSE IS A SENTENCE WHICH CONTAINS AT LEAST A SUBJECT, A VERB AND MAKES MEANING IN ITSELF.

PS. (S+V) and (S+V) : two main clauses are here.

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