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Does the phrase "I once was going an appendectomy" mean "I once was going to receive an operation - appendectomy"? But what follows appears to point out the speaker himself is a doctor who does appendectomy for his patients. Does the phrase mean that the doctor himself became a patient to receive the operation?

I once was going an appendectomy. I cut into my patient’s abdomen and immediately get a weird feeling. When I looked inside, my heart dropped.

Source: Factinate tweeted

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    It is a mistype. Should be "doing" not "going". – fev Jan 27 at 15:42
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    Please don't take tweets as any indication of proper English. When in doubt, throw that tweet out. – FeliniusRex Jan 27 at 18:02
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It seems like there might be a typo in the sentence. If the context is a doctor speaking, then the sentence would say:

"I once was doing an appendectomy. I cut into my patient’s abdomen and immediately get a weird feeling. When I looked inside, my heart dropped."

If you were a spectator heading to watch the surgery, you might say, "I once was going an appendectomy. I sat in the balcony and watched the doctor perform the operation."

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    I agree with most of that. But in that context, the spectator would have to say "I was watching..." rather than "I was going..." (since the latter implies they were still en route at the time that the next two sentences took place). Also, even if it were "going", it would normally have to be "going to" rather than "going". – rjpond Jan 27 at 18:16
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    It would be incorrect for a spectator to use that sentence. You "go to" an event; you cannot "go" an event. Furthermore, in this context, "went to" is correct and "was going to" is not. – Alpha Draconis Jan 27 at 22:54

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