0

His father had packed his rucksack, but he had forgotten to take off (the rucksack) / take out (an item from the rucksack) when he went for a run.

Here, do we use take off or take out?

4
  • Are you talking about taking something out of the rucksack, or taking off the rucksack? – Kate Bunting Feb 2 at 19:56
  • I have amended your sentence to mean what I think you intend. But you need to respond to Kate Bunting's question before anybody can answer you. – Ronald Sole Feb 2 at 20:58
  • @RonaldSole I think you've edited the answer into the question: "take off/ take out" are the options the learner was trying to choose between. – IMSoP Feb 2 at 22:56
  • @IMSoP I plead guilty, with mitigating circumstances. Apologies! (Have upvoted your answer in penance.) – Ronald Sole Feb 3 at 11:43
1

His father had packed in his rucksack,but which he had forgotten to take off/ take out when he went for a run.

There are a few mistakes in this sentence, which make it a bit unclear what you were trying to say, but I will try to guess.

First, I assume you mean that he put something into his rucksack. In that case, you can't just say "he packed in", you have to say:

His father had packed something in his rucksack...

Or name what was put in:

His father had packed a big book in his rucksack...


Next, "but which" doesn't make sense here. If you want to refer to the item in the rucksack, you need to use it:

... but he had forgotten to ____ it

With a phrasal verb, the "it" goes between the words, so the options are:

... but he had forgotten to take it off ...

and

... but he had forgotten to take it out ...

Alternatively, you can use "which" without "but":

... which he had forgotten to take off ...

or

... which he had forgotten to take out ...


Both "take off" and "take out" mean "remove", but are used differently.

"Take off" generally means removing something from the outside. It's the opposite of "put on", e.g. "in the morning, I put on my socks; in the evening, I take off my socks".

"Take out" generally means removing something from the inside. It's the opposite of "put in", and is what you want here:

His father had packed something in his rucksack, but he had forgotten to take it out when he went for a run.

or:

His father had packed something in his rucksack, which he had forgotten to take out when he went for a run.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.