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I have found a book with a title "Feudlings" and can't find out the meaning. It is a Romeo & Juliet story about two teenagers from warring households who are supposed to end a 300-year-long war by killing the other, but fall in love.

All the dictionaries suggest me a similar word "feuding" but I think it's not the same.

Can you please explain the meaning of the word and give a couple examples with it?

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I would guess that "feudlings" (which isn't in dictionaries) has been coined from feud + ling. "Ling" can be used as a diminutive suffix, for example

duckling = baby duck
foundling = abandoned child/baby who has been found
princeling = young prince.

I would understand feudlings as being either children/young people engaging in a feud, or babies/children born during a feud.

Having been and looked up the book, it seems to be a Romeo & Juliet story about two teenagers from warring households who are supposed to end a 300-year-long war by killing the other, but fall in love.

With that context, I think it's pretty safe to say the author intends "feudlings" to mean "children of a feud".

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  • Certainly makes sense in the context. Without that context, it could just as likely mean feudal vassals (as in paying a feu to their superior) but the story makes it clear which is intended. Feb 4 '21 at 21:18
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    Like underlings/hirelings I suppose? That's true. I was guilty of confirmation bias — the evidence fitted nicely with my first guess, so I didn't go further! Feb 4 '21 at 23:20

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