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I am not very happy with this sentence as I feel it contains duplicate words (use):

UK children ranked the highest in using online games, where 50% of them have use them

I want to change it to this, but I am not sure if do so phrase is correct:

UK children ranked the highest in using online games, where 50% of them do so

Are the two sentences correct? which is better?

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  • The second one is better, but I find ranked ambiguous. I assume you mean included the greatest number of users rather than were the best players? Commented Feb 4, 2021 at 17:33
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    In these sentences, it sounds like where is referring to online games, which is not what you mean. If you want to use where it would be better to reverse the order, like "Children's use of online games was highest in the UK, where..."
    – stangdon
    Commented Feb 4, 2021 at 17:39
  • What @stangdon: English can be very accommodating in terms of where we can use "metaphoric" where (such as earlier in this very sentence, which unlike the UK, isn't a "literal location"). But the noun UK in the cited text is actually being used adjectivally, and there's no other obvious metaphoric location/context to which we can attach where, so it doesn't really work. Commented Feb 4, 2021 at 18:52

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If you were to use one of these sentences, the second one would be the better option. However, both of these sentences can be improved. In the first sentence, the word ranked is in the past tense and the word use is in the present tense. In the second sentence, the phrase do so would not be the best choice at the end. A correct option would be

Children in the UK rank the highest in using online games, where 50% of children use them.

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