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"Prove them wrong." this sentence was a part of this phrase: "Everyone thinks I'm guilty. It's time to prove them wrong." What does the hero literally means, saying "Prove them wrong."?

How to understand this words? Which variant describes the idea better:

Everyone thinks I'm guilty. It's time to prove they are/were wrong.

or

Everyone thinks I'm guilty. It's time to prove them that they are/were wrong.

or

Everyone thinks I'm guilty. It's time to prove them the opposite?

What kind of grammar is it? I would say just "to prove they are wrong." The form of word they ("them") confused me.

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  • to prove them wrong = to prove [to them, everyone, myself, you,...] [that] they are wrong. Feb 5 at 12:59
  • whar kind of grammar is it? I would say just "to prove they are wrong." The form of word they("them") confused me.
    – Naduka Mn
    Feb 5 at 13:08
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Of your options

Everyone thinks I'm guilty. It's time to prove they are/were wrong.

That would be fine choosing are or were according to when they thought it.

Everyone thinks I'm guilty. It's time to prove them that they are/were wrong.

That contains either an unnecessary them or has a missing to before the them.

?Everyone thinks I'm guilty. It's time to prove them the opposite?

The them is again unnecessary.

The basic construction in the original statement prove them wrong is verb noun/pronoun adjective. We have phrases like "paint it black", "Kiss it better", "Drive the teacher crazy" and so on.

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