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I have searched on internet, but nothing was very clear.

Both have the same definition, utilisation ? Can we say by the same way :

I’m sorry, I’m late

I’m sorry I’m in lateness

Or

The package got an issue, it will be dispatched surely late.

The package got an issue, it will be dispatched surely lateness.

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    No one uses "lateness" the way you are doing here. When I see these I am wondering: "translated from Chinese?"
    – GEdgar
    Feb 7 at 20:36
  • Yeah i’m Chinese 😂
    – Alex123
    Feb 7 at 20:49
  • The correct wording of the second example would be "There has been an issue with the package - it will certainly be dispatched late" or "...it will have to be dispatched late" or (if writing to a customer) "...it will unfortunately have to be dispatched late".
    – rjpond
    Feb 8 at 10:40
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"late" is an adjective, "lateness" is a noun. It is like the difference between "wise" and "wisdom". The difference between "joy" and "joyful".

You do say "I am late", you do not say "I am lateness".
You do say "Lateness is a fault I have", you do not say "Late is a fault I have".

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