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They stepped into the house and issues followed in. (ISSUES BEGAN)

Is the use of followed in correct in this context? If not, how can I rewrite it with a better phrase?

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    Perhaps you could explain in other words what it is you want to say? Then we could explore the best way to say it. At the moment your sentence doesn't sound great; at the very least you need a pronoun "... issues followed them in". Even then, it doesn't sound very natural.
    – JMB
    Commented Feb 10, 2021 at 11:41
  • Why would you want to say that the issues "followed [them] in"? I can't see any useful meaning conveyed here by the "quasi-metaphoric" reference to topics travelling "behind" the people who discuss them. Commented Feb 10, 2021 at 13:05
  • Did you mean to write followed on?
    – mdewey
    Commented Feb 10, 2021 at 13:16
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    @Clicker "Follow in" doesn't work. "Begin" is a valid option, as you suggest. How about something like "They stepped into the house and that was when the issues began"? If you want to focus on the moment, you could try something like "No sooner had they stepped into the house than the issues began".
    – JMB
    Commented Feb 10, 2021 at 13:49
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    Prefix quasi- means seemingly, but not really. I'm saying that to talk about abstract things like topics / issues following people around and/or appearing later [than the people they're associated with] is "somewhat metaphorical" (abstract notions can't really move around in space like that). Commented Feb 10, 2021 at 15:00

3 Answers 3

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Providing an answer after some back and forth in the comments above.

"Follow in" doesn't work here. At the very least it would require a pronoun:

issues followed them in

However, it's not natural to talk about problems following a person/people.

A better option would be to use the verb 'begin' or 'start':

They stepped into the house and that was when the issues began

We could improve on this sentence by focussing on the moment the problems began (ie 'when they stepped into the house':

No sooner had they stepped into the house than the issues began

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I am not native but you could say : issues followed them(in) OR problems/trouble started OR problems began to mount/began to develop.

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No, it is not correct.

I like:

In they came--and problems with them.

When they stepped into the house, the nightmare began.

They stepped in; I stepped out.

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