0

dappled sunlight had danced in Soraya’s eyes, and of the delicate hollows above her collarbone.

Here why have we used the word 'of' before 'delicate hollows' instead of using 'on the delicate hollows'

The usage of the word 'of' on Google is written as 'following a noun derived from or related to a verb' where expressing the subject of the verb underlying the first noun.

So here the first noun or subject of the verb should be sunlight. Then why use it before delicate hollows?

1
  • 3
    Please edit and add the source of the quote, and ideally a link. The basic problem is that you haven't quoted the full sentence. But I'll let you fix that.
    – James K
    Feb 12 '21 at 7:53
3

@JamesK is right, the full quote reveals a different meaning:

That night in bed, I thought of the way dappled sunlight had danced in Soraya's eyes, and of the delicate hollows above her collarbone.

The person thought of two separate things, both related to Soraya’s physical appearance (and only one related to sunlight).

  1. Dappled sunlight dancing in her eyes.

  2. The delicate hollows above her collarbone.

That being said, I would almost accept what you thought it said, as I do like the way it sounds, and in that case “of” would be substituting for the word “about”, i.e. sunlight “dancing about her eyes”. It also has the feel of the sunlight “making something of” the hollows above her collarbone.

It’s probably quite wrong, but I do like the way it sounds, the poetic feel of it, and I can understand where your confusion probably came from on this one.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .