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Which of the following is the best choice if I want to say that we must facilitate information flow within the company at the same time as we must not let parties outside the company get hold of any information?

  1. We need to facilitate information flow within – but not from – the company.
  1. We need to facilitate information flow within – but not out of – the company.
  1. We need to facilitate information flow within – but not out from – the company.

Thank you!

2 Answers 2

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"Out of" sounds most natural to me.

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I'd say,

'We need to facilitate information flow within but not outside the company.'

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  • Thank you! That would mean something different though, wouldn't it? What I'm after is that we mustn't let any information leak, as it were.
    – Helen
    Commented Feb 16, 2021 at 12:38
  • To me 'facilitate' means there will be information flow, within and outside. And we needn't facilitate it but just leave it as is when it comes to information flow outside the company. Change the verb 'facilitate', perhaps? Commented Feb 18, 2021 at 20:16
  • Hm... not sure I understand what you mean? Why would the use of "facilitate" (='to make easy', 'to enable', 'to promote') in any way influence the meaning of "information flow"? Sorry for being slow...
    – Helen
    Commented Feb 19, 2021 at 17:21
  • That is, we need to do all that we can to make information flow as easy and efficient as possible within the company, but we must not make it easier for information to "leave" the company
    – Helen
    Commented Feb 19, 2021 at 17:23

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