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Is "clear-watered" an adjective like "soft-petalled"?

Is it right to say, "The clear-watered pond was serene to look at"

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    I would use: a pond with clear water. The pond is not watered. Lawns are watered. To water it to use a hose to cover with water. – Lambie Feb 16 at 21:35
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    No, it is not like soft-petalled. You cannot use it in ordinary language, because it comes off as either ornate or clumsy. You could only use the phrase either in poetry or as part of a medieval fantasy. – FeliniusRex Feb 16 at 21:43
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    Don't listen to the nay sayers. I think it's fine. Extra poetic points for an apostrophe a clear-water'd pond – Michael Harvey Feb 16 at 22:35
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    Using apostrophes in poetry is a clear demerit for me. Any modern poem that uses o'er goes straight o'er my shoulder – James K Feb 16 at 23:03
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    I think it's fine, especially in a poem. No apostrophe is needed. Very few readers these days (I'm looking at you, Michael) would pronounce 'watered' with three syllables. – Old Brixtonian Feb 17 at 6:40
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It's understandable, but rather unusual. As noted in comments, there is interference in understanding between the intended adjective meaning, and a particple "watered" (from the verb "to water"). It seems to be a rather rare construction. As other comments show, there is use of "clear watered" (both with and without a hyphen). So if this works for you poetically, then you can use it.

Perhaps you do not need to mention "water" at all. Ponds are assumed to be filled with water, so you don't need to mention it. Would "The crystal clear pond was serene to look at" work (the meter is similar but not exactly the same)

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    A pond could (especially in poetic writing) could be said to possess its water, so why can't we form compound adjectives like clear-watered, dark-watered, blue-watered, etc, in the same way that we form red-haired, long-legged, brown-eyed, and so on? – Michael Harvey Feb 17 at 7:24
  • .... but we can. It's understandable and if it works then you can use it. But there is interference from the participle. You need to double think to realise it is a compound adjective and not a participle. So you can form adjectives like dark-watered. Where have I said you can't? – James K Feb 17 at 7:37
  • My 'why can't...' question was really addressed to all the people above who said it was not possible. – Michael Harvey Feb 17 at 8:13

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