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Assume that there are many car's catalogs, and each catalog lists a different type of car. I would like to know whether the sentence below I created based on this assumption is correct:

This type of car is more expensive than any other type of car listed in each catalog.

I think changing "each catalog" to "these catalogs " may cause the sentence to sound more natural, but I would like to make clear that each catalog lists a different type of car.

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    I think you may be using the word catalog slightly wrongly, which might make it harder to answer your question. A catalog is a list of multiple items.
    – stangdon
    Feb 21, 2021 at 18:56
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    It's a slightly unusual context, but assuming "this type of car" appears in several different catalogues, AND this type of car is always the most expensive type of car in any given catalogue within which it appears at all, it's syntactically fine. Changing to these catalogues rather changes the meaning though. The original version unambiguously asserts that this type of car appears in several catalogues (where it's always the most expensive). When rephrased, it's possible this type of car doesn't actually appear in any catalogues (but it's more expensive than any that do). Feb 21, 2021 at 19:03
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    (I'm not sure how to incorporate the idea that "each catalog lists a different type of car". It's possible that this turns the entire concept of the cited sentence into complete nonsense.) Feb 21, 2021 at 19:05
  • My example may be inappropriate, but I would like only to know whether it is possible to use ".. than any other …" in combination with "each ...".
    – rama9
    Feb 21, 2021 at 19:10
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    I'm now completely certain the example is nonsense, and can't tell us anything useful about using any and each in a single sentence. Feb 21, 2021 at 19:11

2 Answers 2

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This type of car is more expensive than any other type of car listed in each catalog.

This sentence is unnatural and very hard to parse. The word "each" denotes that we're making a series of separate assertions about each catalog, individually, but the word "any" denotes that we're making a single, universally-quantified assertion about all of the different types of car, in all of the different catalogs, at once. You can't do both of those things at once. There are two conflicting readings:

  1. This type of car is the most expensive, throughout all of the catalogs.
  2. Within each catalog, this type of car is the most expensive.

The sentence is ambiguous and communicates neither of these meanings very well.

If you want to say that this is the single most expensive type of car, out of all the types listed in all the catalogs, you would write:

This type of car is more expensive than any other type of car listed in any catalog.

However, that could imply that you're talking about all catalogs, anywhere and everywhere, so you might instead want to limit the scope:

This type of car is more expensive than any other type of car listed in any of these catalogs.

On the other hand, if you want to indicate that each catalog has a number of different types of car, and this type is always the most expensive, you could write:

In each catalog, this type of car is more expensive than any other.

This statement may look superficially similar to the one that we started with, but by moving the "each" to the beginning of the sentence, we clarify that "any other" only ranges over the other types of car within each catalog, rather than ranging over all of the types of car in all of the catalogs.

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The short answer is that the sentence sounds quite confused.

It would depends on the listener’s familiarity as to what would be said.

With little familiarity, I’d say something like:

Based on these catalogues, this type of car is the most expensive.

Or if the person was there as I was perusing the catalogues, it might just be a gesture and:

These are the most expensive.

You also need to clarify if you’re talking about types or brands/manufacturers of car, as this would influence what would be said.

But, without thinking too deeply about it, I don’t feel I’d ever find myself using an expression such as the one in your question, simply because, with whatever context at hand, I think there’d always be a simpler way to say it.

The multiple uses of “any” and “each” sounds, to me, quite finicky and somewhat confused.

If it was really required that the listener understood that each catalogue lists a different “type” of car, I think this would be explained separately, as it really is a separate point from price comparison.

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