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I need to refer generically to people who meet the following criteria (and I need to include all the information in one single noun phrase):

  • they have at least part-time employment
  • they have permanent employment
  • they start their employment no later than 1 June 2021

Considering this, would any of the following work, and if so, which would be the better choice?

Anyone who 1 June 2021 has at least part-time permanent employment

Anyone who has at least part-time permanent employment as of 1 June 2021 at the latest

Anyone who has at least part-time permanent employment starting no later than 1 June 2021

Thank you!

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  • Is there part-time employment that isn't permanent within your org?
    – Polygnome
    Feb 25 at 11:47
  • @Polygnome Why yes – of course? Why wouldn't there be? Any temporary employment is by definition non-permanent, right? Or have I completely misunderstood something? "Permanent employment" is what you call employment that lasts for an indefinite period of time, right? Employment that isn't temporary?
    – Helen
    Feb 25 at 12:35
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They make sense, however, they do have a slightly different meaning and I would go for option three.

  1. Anyone who on 1 June 2021 has at least part-time permanent employment

Note the added "on". This means that is doesn't matter when they started, but this includes everyone that has part-time permanent employment on June 1st 2021.

  1. Anyone who has at least part-time permanent employment as of 1 June 2021 at the latest

Same meaning as 1.

  1. Anyone who has at least part-time permanent employment starting no later than 1 June 2021

This one has a slightly different meaning, where this includes people that currently have not started their employment, but will start with at least part-time employment on or before June 1st. So considering that in the three criteria you stated it in this way, this one fits best.

Question: What is beneath part-time employment? You say at least part-time, but other than full time I’m unsure what there is. If there's nothing below part-time, you can ignore that part in all sentences.

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  • Thank you so much! Makes perfect sense :) And you're right, of course, about there being nothing beneath part-time employment. I'll have to ask my client why they want to include this. Maybe because "Anyone who has permanent employment starting no later than 1 June 2021" still leaves room for doubt as to whether this includes part-time employment as well?
    – Helen
    Feb 25 at 12:41
  • 1
    Could be, but I'd say that adding the part-time part makes it more likely to miss the 'at least' part and read the sentence like it is only for part time. So, if you leave it out, I'd go with your latest sentence indeed!
    – Jeroen
    Feb 25 at 12:52
  • I completely agree! Again: thank you so much for your help!
    – Helen
    Feb 25 at 12:58
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I would suggest starting right of the bat with the most important information:

Any permanent employee with at least part-time employment as of June 1st, 2021, [...]

"Any permanent employee" already encompasses both part-time and full-time employment. The supplemental information only affirms that yes, this also means part-time employees and is merely clarification to assuage doubts (if any exist).

Its also stylistic (in my humble opinion) better and more formal not to use "anyone", but to properly identify the correct group right off the bat. You could also use parentheses to make it even more clear that the further information is supplemental.

Any permanent employee (with at least part-time employment) as of June 1st, 2021, [...]

Putting parentheses around it also makes it less likely that the sentence is misunderstood to only mean part-time employees. You could also explicitly mention both groups to further reduce the possibility of misinterpretation and confusion:

Any permanent employee (both part-time and full-time) as of June 1st, 2021, [...]

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