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You say or write something that make others upset and they start to criticize you very hard.

This particularly often happens on a social network.

Say, you posted on Facebook saying that "women should stay at home taking care of children and not going to work". A lot of feminists felt upset with your comment and they start to criticize you.

Just imagine that in the past, there was a man who said God was not real and the crowd threw stones at him when he was escorted on the street by the authority.

In Vietnamese we say "you have been being stoned for that" (translated literally).

Is it correct to say "you have been being stoned" to mean you are criticized very hard by many people?

Note: it must carry the meaning that "a lot of people have been criticizing that person".

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I wouldn't recognise that without very good context, especially since someone being stoned can mean someone being intoxicated (ok probably wrong word there) by marijuana.

However, I have heard someone being lynched or crucified for a comment along those lines.

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  • Just imagine that in the past, there was a man who said God was not real and the crowd threw stones at him when he was escorted on the street by the authority. – Tom Mar 5 at 6:34
  • @Tom I do understand what stoning someone means, it is just that it is not a saying that I have ever heard before in the context of being criticised online. I would recommend going with something more familiar. – Garden Elf Mar 8 at 3:47
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Crucify:

informal Criticize (someone) severely and unrelentingly. (Lexico)

Pillory:

Attack or ridicule publicly. (Lexico)

"You have been being crucified/pilloried" is unlikely: it would work with "getting" instead of "being".

"Stoned" isn't a likely metaphor. As Garden Elf rightly said, "stoned" often means "high on drugs".

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  • It has to mean "a lot of people criticize her". So, when we say "I have been being crucified", does it mean that a lot of people are criticizing me or just one? – Tom Mar 5 at 8:22
  • It could mean either. If we were talking about a social-media pile-on then it would probably be obvious from the context that it was a lot of people criticising you. On Lexico, most of the examples refer to collective attacks, at least six do so unambiguously and only two refer to individual attacks. – rjpond Mar 5 at 8:37
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We can't say have been being in English. Either you have been criticised/stoned in the past, or you are being criticised now.

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