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Which one is correct:

Did you receive the parcel? I am a little worried because it contains some traditional pastry that might be expired.

Did you receive the parcel? I am a little worried because it contains some traditional pastry that might pass its expiration date.

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  • It's dates (the calendar sort) that expire, not pastries. The latter may go stale, mouldy or off. Mar 5, 2021 at 20:16
  • @RonaldSole ?? I don't think that's correct at all. You can find plenty of references to expired food.
    – stangdon
    Mar 5, 2021 at 20:40
  • @stangdon Granted. The usage in the sense of to pass its expiration date is new to me. Mar 6, 2021 at 0:02

1 Answer 1

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You tagged this British English. Food stuffs in the UK are labelled with a Use by date or a Best before date although there are suggestions that this might be changed. So neither of your choices is idiomatic. The difference is that Use before means it might be dangerous after that date, best before just means its qualities might have deteriorated. In fact curiously we do not not use them that much in speech. You would often hear

"Did you receive the parcel? I am a little worried because it contains some traditional pastry that might have gone past its sell by date."

Of course Use by or Best before date would sound just as good.

Of your two options expiry date is used in other contexts like the date by which a credit card or some form of pass becomes invalid. Expiration date is perfectly understandable but would sound unusual.

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