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Wong said one charge - that of providing false information - brought against one of the organizers was for giving police the incorrect number for a street address, though the correct street name was provided.

Reuters

Is it just another way of saying which is? And does those of act in the same way with plural?

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  • "one charge - that of providing false information .." is simply the way it is said. It is precise and helpful. – doc Jul 8 '14 at 11:11
  • "Simply the way it is said", though helpful, is an observation rather than an analysis. It can also be analyzed. – snailplane Jul 8 '14 at 11:27
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Using "that" is a way of avoiding repetition. Otherwise the sentence would be:

One charge - the charge of providing false information ...

Instead of saying "that of", you can also say "the one of" or "namely". I find it difficult to use "which is" without the sentence sounding awkward or changing the meaning.

Since there were 4 different charges: failure to comply with instructions from a police officer, obstructing officers performing their duties, leaving a running vehicle and providing false information to an officer, if you refer to more than one, you can use "those of", just as you suggested:

Two charges - those of leaving a running vehicle and providing false information ...

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Firstly, I feel that the sentence must have 'em-dashes' and not the hyphens that you typed there.

Now, answer to your second question - No. The those of... won't fit there because the sentence is about a single charge due to an act of providing false information.

Answer to the first question - yes. It may work in this context.

'Em-dashes' are used to replace commas here. You may simply remove those dashes and put commas along with your option which is and it'll convey the scene.

Wong said one charge, which is providing false information, brought against one of the organizers was for giving police the incorrect number for a street address, though the correct street name was provided.

[Side note: I think it's an indirect speech and thus should have that. Wong said that... If it's not, it should have the quotes - Wong said, "One charge, ..."]

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Yes, this is a correct, simple and respected clause used to identify specific matters, especially in legal parlance.

And yes, a plural version can be made to work just as well:

"Wong said two charges - that of providing false information and that of assaulting a police officer- brought against one of the organizers..."

~or~

"Two pairs of shoes - those of the victim and those of the accused, were found at the scene of the crime."

Both of these examples are used to specify what is being referred to.

"Which is" might be used to describe something about a [charge] - but no, it cannot be used in the circumstance you describe.

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