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yet: somebody/something has yet to do something formal used to say that someone has not done something, or that something has not happened when you think it should already have been done or have happened: I have yet to hear Ray's version of what happened. (Longman’s)

yet: The team has not yet won a game. = The team has not won a game yet. = The team has yet to win a game. (Merriam-Webster’s)

I understand what meaning the structure above has. But I’m wondering if the last sentence, The team has yet to win a game, could be interpreted as another meaning. Let’s suppose a soccer team that has won a game in a qualifying round, and it now has to win at least one more game to advance to the second round. In the case, can we say this sentence: “The team has yet to win a game”?

  • I would say: The team has to win a / one more game yet. – user3214 Jul 8 '14 at 13:32
  • I think the minimum change would be, "The team has yet to win another game". – Damkerng T. Jul 8 '14 at 15:41
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"The team has yet to win a game" means that, as of this time, the team has not won any games. Depending on the context, it could mean that they have never won a game since the team was first established, or it could mean they have not won any games in this season or this match.

If you are trying to describe a situation where the team must win two games to advance to the next round or something of that sort, and they have only won one so far, you could add additional qualifiers to the sentence to narrow the meaning. Like, "The team has yet to win a game in the second round" or "The team has yet to win a second game".

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In the case, can we say this sentence: “The team has yet to win a game”?

No. That sentence only means 'The team has not won any games as present'.

As @GATA says, you would have to say something like:

The team has to win one more game yet

  • The "yet" on the the end of the sentence may be valid, but it feels odd to say it. I think it's a bit more natural to say "The team still has to win one more game" or "the team still have one more game to win." – Obfuskater Jul 8 '14 at 14:22
  • Agreed. Seeing as we were using 'yet', I left it in – user8543 Jul 8 '14 at 14:50

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