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I parked outside the entrance of/to the building.

Are both correct and mean the same thing?

3 Answers 3

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I think yes, both do mean the same thing, of is relating/pointing to the building and to is also pointing to the building, both words are pointing to the building and so they mean the same thing.

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Q. I parked outside the entrance of/to the building. Are both correct and mean the same thing?

My Answer; Yes


I parked outside the entrance of the building

of; preposition (POSSESSION): used to show possession, belonging, or origin:

I parked outside the entrance belonging to the building


I parked outside the entrance to the building

to preposition (BELONGING); matching or belonging to:

I parked outside the entrance belonging to the building

All ref CED OF

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Grammatically they're different, because in the entrance to the building the to phrase is a complement, which supplies part of the meaning of "entrance"; whereas of the building is an adjunct, supplying supplementary information about the entrance.

But I can't think of a case where there is a difference in meaning. Entrance to seems to be more common than entrance of, but not hugely so (758:533 in the iWeb corpus).

I think that where the focus of attention is the entrance, you're more likely to say entrance to; but when the focus is the building, and the entrance is being mentioned in passing, then entrance of might be as common (though to would still be possible).

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