1

Is "car 1, car 2, and car 3" equal to "cars 1 to 3"?

Is "step 1 step 2, step 3, step 4, and step 5" equal to "steps 1 to 5"

Is "Grade 1, Grade 2, Grade 3, Grade 4, Grade 5, and Grade 6" equal to "Grades 1 to 6"?

Should I add "s" after the word such as "car", "step", or "Grade" like the bolded ones above?

Are the examples down below correct?

Are the cases of each example equivalent?

(1)

Car 1, car 2, and car 3 are going to be sanitized.

= Car 1 to car 3 are going to be sanitized.

= Cars 1 to 3 are going to be sanitized.

(2)

Step 1 step 2, step 3, step 4, and step 5 are the most crucial in the making of the product.

= Step 1 to step 5 are the most crucial in the making of the product.

= Steps 1 to 5 are the most crucial in the making of the product.

(3)

Grade 1, Grade 2, Grade 3, Grade 4, Grade 5, and Grade 6 are basic education for kids.

= Grade 1 to Grade 6 are basic education for kids.

= Grades 1 to 6 are basic education for kids.

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  • 1
    The third option is the most natural in each case. Mar 13 at 14:20
  • What if some people recognise the existence of "Grade 2½"? Would you want that included? Should "Grades 1-6" include "Grade 6½"? Mar 13 at 14:43
0

In each case, there are multiple cars/steps/grades so you use a plural form

... grades one to six (or one through six)

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  • Do the forms in each example mean the same? And are the examples correct?
    – vincentlin
    Mar 13 at 17:33
  • Yes they mean the same. I might say "... provide a basic education". As a the grades are not themselves education. Or "children receive a basic education in grades 1 to 6". And note that education systems vary from place to place, and the definition of "basic" isn't universally agreed.
    – James K
    Mar 13 at 17:52

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