1

I know the meaning of tend and there is but I cannot get exact meaning and grammatical rule of there does tend to be in the following sentence:

In applied mathematics (mechanics, statistics, decision mathematics, and so on), there does tend to be more focus on solving problems and less on developing abstract theories. (source: How to Study for a Mathematics Degree by Lara Alcock)

-----Edit (clarifying my question)

What is the difference between the following forms in meaning and what are the grammatical structure of the sentences?

  1. There is more focus on solving problems.
  2. There tends to be more focus on solving problems.
  3. There does tend to be more focus on solving problems.
2
  • By the way, this sentence is from the book "how to study for a mathematics degree" by lara alcock . Mar 15 at 15:08
  • Thanks for telling us the source in a comment. Next time, please include that information in your question.
    – Eddie Kal
    Mar 15 at 16:02
1

It means that the thing/phenomenon/result is generally the case.

More often than not, something is true.
It can be widely observed that ......
There is broad agreement that.......

There does tend to be more rain in summer than winter.
There does tend to be more casual work in spring.
There does tend to be a lot of noise from the main road.

1

If something 'tends' towards a particular result, it means that, more often than not that is the case.

Presenting data that shows trends and tendencies is often very credible and can support a theory or a statement. However, as tendencies are not a strict rule, you will find that people put them across in a variety of ways depending on how solidly they think it proves what they are saying.

"In applied mathematics, there tends to be more focus on solving problems and less on developing abstract theories."

This means that that, in the field of mathematics, emphasis is placed more often than not on problem solving than developing abstract theories.

Notice that, in your quotation, it says "there does tend to be". This is a more gingerly way of putting the same statement across, and may be that the writer wanted to be slightly non-committal so as not to exclude the exceptions. Saying "there does tend to be" places emphasis on the observed results.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.