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Resurrect:

Restore (a dead person) to life.

"he was dead, but he was resurrected"

Resuscitate:

Revive: (someone) from unconsciousness or apparent death.

"an ambulance crew tried to resuscitate him"

Revive:

Restore to life or consciousness.

"both men collapsed, but were revived"

How does Resuscitate differ from Revive? and are any of these 3 words interchangeable?

Definition source: Google.

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    In (1) the person was dead, in (2) was not dead, in (3) similar to (2), or perhaps still conscious – That coffee has revived me. Mar 18, 2021 at 20:12

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You would use "resurrect" when the person in question was most definitely dead, and had been for some time. Hence it would be used only in the context of miraculous deeds. It is impossible for someone who is well-and-truly dead to come back to life. It can't happen.

You would use "resuscitate" if the person in question had stopped breathing, and/or their heart had stopped beating. You pound on the person's chest, or blow into their lungs, whatever, in order to get their vital functions working again, before they are actually dead.

You would use "revive" if the person is still breathing and their heart is still beating, but they are (usually temporarily) unable to perform the tasks they need to do in order to accomplish their goals. The subtext is that they are worn out, or knocked off their feet, or just exhausted. (They may or may not also be unconscious.) They can be "revived", perhaps by giving them a drink or some food, or just let them sit down or lie down for a while, or apply smelling-salts, or whatever. Sooner or later they will recover.

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    revive is also a more general meaning and can be applied to plants and even non living objects or emotions etc. "to revive someone's hopes/confidence/fortunes" or "Traditional skills are being revived".
    – Brad
    Mar 19, 2021 at 5:59
  • @Brad Indeed. All words have metaphorical or figurative uses: "to resurrect an acting career" for example. My answer deliberately kept it simple. Mar 20, 2021 at 8:20
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They are similar but not identical.

These three words have similar meanings with subtle differences that can become more obvious when you dissect their Latin roots (all three are from Latin).

Resurrect:

  • Re-: prefix meaning "again"
  • -surrect: verb root from "surrectum," meaning "risen"

Taken literally, "to be upright (arisen) again"

Resuscitate:

  • Re-: prefix meaning "again"
  • -sus-: infix meaning "under"
  • -citate: verb root from "citare", meaning "to summon"

Taken literally, "to summon up (from under) again"

Revive:

  • Re-: prefix meaning "again"
  • -vive: verb root from "vivere" meaning "to live"

Taken literally, "to (make to) live again"

Etymologies taken from wiktionary, glosbe, and etymonline.

Note the definition you posted for "resuscitate,"

Revive: (someone) from unconsciousness or apparent death.

Here the key word is "apparent." As mentioned in another answer, "resuscitate" is only used for near-death. "Revive" is the most broad and you could argue that you can substitute "Revive" for either "Resuscitate" and "Resurrect". However, you would not say you "resuscitate" a corpse that's been dead for two years, nor that you "resurrected" someone who had a heart attack a minute ago (unless you wanted to be very dramatic).

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Revive is used to define resuscitate in the list of meanings you have shared here. If you dig more, you will find revive being used to define resurrect also. It means revive is one of the meanings of resuscitate and resurrect. It depends on the context in which you use the words.

resurrected back to life, revived back to life, resuscitated back to life.

All three mean the same---brought back to life.

You can use all three to explain the action of bringing back someone/something to life from the dead; but, the words revive and resuscitate need not always be about death; on the other hand, resurrection can happen only when the person is already dead.

However, the meanings of resurrection and resuscitation seem to differ with clean distinction in biblical context. Try a google search of this string: "resuscitate vs resurrect" + "bible"

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