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Which one of these is correct to say about a payment that is just entered in the system (few minutes ago) for payment:

  1. These are being entered in the system for payment.
  2. These are being entered now in the system for payment.
  3. These are entered in the system for payment.
  4. These have been entered in the system for payment.
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    Are being entered means that it is happening now. If the transaction is finished, use (4). Commented Mar 19, 2021 at 16:52
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    Why would any of them be wrong? You tell us, please.
    – Lambie
    Commented Apr 21, 2022 at 15:26

3 Answers 3

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Q. Which one of these is correct to say about a payment that is just entered in the system (few minutes ago) for payment:


These are being entered in the system for payment.

These are being entered now in the system for payment.

These are entered in the system for payment.

These have been entered in the system for payment.


Again a no context phrase. These type of question are so difficult to answer.

Firstly I would suggest entered into would be the correct phrase

Secondly what is "for payment"?

Does it form part of a name "system for payment". or a phrase? What does it mean?

Or should it be entered in the system "ready" for payment

Finally what are you trying to say. As Kate has correctly pointed out your statements have different meanings.


  1. These are being entered in the "System for Payment". (entered into a type of Payment system)

2.These are being entered now (at this minute) into the system ready for payment.


3.These are entered into the system for payment. (describing an action) We take the Cheques these are entered into the system for payment into the client accounts.


  1. These have been entered in the system for payment. (describing an action in the past) Where are the Cheques? I entered them into the system for payment to the client accounts. Then I filed them

Example How To Get Your Salary Paid Into Your Account Ref HSBC

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  1. and 2) mean the same; the 'now' in 2) is redundant.

(3) does not tell the time of the event. Such a construction can be used to describe any event that is always true.

(4) says that the event has occurred, as you have intended.

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  • You know we generally say: A construction like that or such as that.
    – Lambie
    Commented Jul 9, 2021 at 22:20
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Correct: (4)

All the sentences are in passive voice.

The first two sentences are in the present continuous/progressive tense. (These are being...payment) The action is not finished. It is continuing.

The third sentence is in the simple present tense. We can say 'These are...payment every Monday/once a week/every day/every month etc.'

The last one is in the present perfect tense. (These have been...payment) The action is finished. This is the correct answer.

The simple past tense can also be used if time (yesterday, last week, a few minutes etc.) is mentioned. These were...payment a few minutes ago.

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