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1 : He always find 'It hard to get up'

2 : our company tried the videoconferencing technology, but found 'It too inconvenience'

3 : Some manager find 'It difficult to delegate'

I think after 'It' in this sentences need to "BE"verb like "He always find It (is) hard to get up" But There isn't any Verb

I really have been wondering while i'm studying English But My country Teacher have just one answer " It's just an adjective phrase so Just memorize it." But i can't understand with just Memorizing

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    Pehaps move to ELL
    – Peter
    Commented Mar 25, 2021 at 5:48
  • Just a point, your second sentence should be "our company tried the videoconferencing technology, but found it too inconvenient". Inconvenience is a noun and the "find it ..." phrases always need an adverb. Your other sentences contain the adverbs hard and difficult. It is possible to use a noun in "find it" phrases but you have to use an article, usually the indefinite article, as well. The sentence might then be our company tried the videoconferencing technology, but found It an inconvenience. Don't try to use this until you understand it better, though. It's not easy.
    – BoldBen
    Commented Mar 25, 2021 at 8:13
  • There are errors in all three sentences. He always finds it hard to get up. Some managers find it difficult to delegate. Commented Mar 25, 2021 at 9:01
  • 'Our company tried the videoconferencing technology, but found it to be too inconvenient' is fine. Deletions are commonly used in English. Using to-be deletion here gives the equally acceptable variant 'Our company tried the videoconferencing technology, but found it too inconvenient'. Other verbs beside 'find' behave similarly ('We reckoned / considered / thought ... him too inexperienced'), while other verbs don't ('We saw him to be lazy and insolent'). Some verbs seem to work only with certain adjectives. Commented Mar 25, 2021 at 17:44

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Congratulations with your progress in English, which is an Indo-European language with structures quite different from your language. The type of construction you are asking about is verb + object + complement. This means that the verb is followed by the object and "completed" with some kind of description. This is governed by the verb, which means that different verbs may take different forms. This is common in English.

Both of these examples are correct for the verb "find", which you observed:

He always finds it hard to get up.

He always finds it is hard to get up.

But "know" is different:

I know him to be honest.

Not: I know him honest.

You can find a further explanation at this site:

https://www.englishgrammar.org/verb-patterns-subject-verb-object-object-complement/

Keep it up and ask questions; you are doing the right thing.

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