0

"Please provide a list of certifications received in the table below and attach each completed form."

Q1. What's the structure of the first half of that sentence?

'Provide + a list of certifications received + in ~'? or

'Provide + a list of certifications + received in ~'? or something else?

Q2. What's the meaning of "provide" and "received" in that context? What is another suitable word for them each?

Q3. Regarding "received", Who or What "received" what?

2
  • Is this a homework question? – BillJ Mar 27 at 7:03
  • No, it's an English test problem. – user132276 Mar 27 at 7:05
0

"Please provide a list of certifications received in the table below and attach each completed form."

A1

'Provide + a list of certifications received + in ~'

A2

'Provide + a list of certifications + received in ~'

I simplify the instruction as 'provide list in table and attach form'.

Of your 2 choices, A1 is closer to the right answer.

The term "received" can mean 'obtained' or 'awarded'.

The candidate is filling in the table, hence 'provide', which may mean 'supply' or 'give' in dictionary, is not the preferred verb.

The instruction could have been rephrased; 'fill details of' or 'provide details of' would be clearer.

The candidate received the list of certifications.

3
  • Thank you for your answer. But, If you want to mean "The candidate received the list of certifications", shouldn't 'YOU(=candidate)' be before 'received', like "Please provide a list of certifications YOU received"? – user132276 Mar 27 at 8:36
  • And my dictionary says 'to provide' means 'to supply' or 'to give'. Can 'to provide' mean really 'to fill in a form', too? – user132276 Mar 27 at 8:44
  • The 'you' is implied. I have edited my reply. – Seowjooheng Singapore Mar 27 at 9:26

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.