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In order for me to be scared of your threats, I got to believe in those 15 extra gang members.

Is 'got to' here nothing but 'had to'? If not, could you show me any other example sentences that has "got to" with the same meaning in them?

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have to and have got to are idiomatic ways of saying must. They are mainly used in spoken English: if you search with Google books, you will mainly find political speeches that have been recorded verbatim.

We have got to get some answers from the federal side - Public health reports

In informal American English, the have is sometimes omitted, as in the sentence that you quoted. Searches in Google Books for I got to, you mainly find the meanings "arrived at" and "be able to"... 3a for the intransitive verb. The few instances that match the meaning of your sentences occur in dialogue in gangster type novels, for example:

He shook his head. “I don't mind telling you, I got to hand it to the f**ker." - the Kaisho- Eric van Lustbader

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Definition 3 at Wiktionary:

got to: (informal) Alternative form of have got to ("have to; must")

So it means "have to" in the present tense. In order for the person to be scared of the threats, they must believe that there are more gang members than they can see. If they do not believe, they will not be scared.

In spoken American English the two hard T's (got to) are elided and the phrase is pronounced gotta.

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In order for me to be scared of your threats, I got to believe in those 15 extra gang members.

Q.

Is 'got to' here nothing but 'had to'? If not, could you show me any other example sentences that has "got to" with the same meaning in them?


"I (have) got to believe in"

A. Yes although I would have written the question as 'is got to' here nothing but 'have to'?

Have got to and have to

English Grammar Today: Have got to and have to mean the same. Have got to is more informal.

Ref C.E.D.

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