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I know that we use the present simple to talk about actions that happen regularly, and the present progressive to talk about actions that are happening as we speak. For example: I am going to school at the moment And I go to school every day

But what do we do when we want to combine "Every Day" with "This Year", for example:

I am reading a book every day this year

Or

I read(reed) a book every day this year

This year, when I go to school, I drive

Or

This year, when I go to school, I am driving

I eat rice every day this week when I am eating lunch

Or

I am eating rice every day this week when I am eating lunch

What I am asking is what tense we should use with things that happen regularly, but in a restricted time span?

2 Answers 2

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Combine regular time spans with restricted time spans I know that we use the present simple to talk about actions that happen regularly, and the present progressive to talk about actions that are happening as we speak. For example: I am going to school at the moment And I go to school every day

Q.

But what do we do when we want to combine "Every Day" with "This Year",

for example:

I am reading a book every day this year


I have one very large problem with answering this question. "Perspective!"

From where (in relation to the restricted time spans) are you asking the question Before, during or after (ongoing) as this will decide the tense used.

I am going to read a book every day this year.

I am reading a book every day during this year

I read a book every day during this year (everyday, to date)

perspective noun (THOUGHT); a particular way of considering something: C.E.D.

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  • I didn't understand from your explanation the difference between "I am reading a book every day during this year I read a book every day during this year (everyday, to date)
    – user1425
    Commented Dec 8, 2022 at 10:22
  • "reading" is on going it is a continuing action. The act has not finished. Read is past it has finished or maybe reflectively it may be finished, who knows? only count the eggs you have in your basket. "I have read a book everyday, to date" When would you use this? well an optamist would be sure that this will continue whilst a pesimist would use the second they are not sure if this can continue. But that is reading a book: a soldier, a refugee, an olympian and many others may have a much more realistic use for one of these terms.
    – Brad
    Commented Jun 10, 2023 at 19:18
  • Brad, where did you get "read" as the past form from? It's not in the past, it's in the present. "He is reading a book every day during this year/ He reads a book every day during this year (everyday, to date)
    – user1425
    Commented Jun 12, 2023 at 7:18
  • @ user1425 1. Back to the question "Combine regular time spans with restricted time spans" Presumably you agree a second, a minute, an hour, a day, a week, a year, are all regular time spans whilst a irregular part of any are not. reading a book every day during this year does not combine iregular time spans. 2. "read: the action or an instance of reading" which in this casehas been completed every day todate. What the future holds we cannot know and tomorrow we may not be able to continue reading. "This year to date" is not a regular time span. Something completed is in the past.
    – Brad
    Commented Jun 12, 2023 at 16:47
  • @ user1425 sorry I had to reduce the length of my comment and in the process, well!!!. The penultimate sentence should read "This year to date" is not a regular time span it is a restricted one
    – Brad
    Commented Jun 12, 2023 at 16:55
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We would use the present perfect tense. This is the tense that indicates something has been happening over a period of time and is still happening in the present.

I have read books every day this year.

I have driven to school this year.

I have eaten rice for lunch every day this week.

You could also replace “I have” with the contraction “I’ve.”

If you wanted to express that an action happened over time up to a point in the past (rather than the present), you could use the past perfect tense.

For example, if you said “I had eaten rice every day this week,” this means you ate rice all the previous days, but you had something different today.

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  • It's also perfectly acceptable to use the continuous tense (what you call the progressive) if the habit is ongoing. "I'm reading a book every day this year", "I'm driving to school this year" "I'm having/eating rice for lunch every day this week." (It's not necessary to use the verb eat twice in the sentence.) Commented Mar 29, 2021 at 9:50

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