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I have seen a couple of phrasal verbs that must be separated. One of them is "ask in" verb. My question is how I can separate and put my long phrase between verb and particle. For example:

I 'asked' the woman that stays in front of the door 'in' but she didn't accept.

(I think this version is wrong but the site page says we must separate the verb.)

https://www.usingenglish.com/reference/phrasal-verbs/ask.html#Ask-in

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    Ask in needs to be separated with a pronoun, but it's unidiomatic to try to fit a longer phrase in there. You would have to reword it. "There was a woman standing on the doorstep. I asked her in, but she didn't accept." Mar 29 '21 at 16:49
  • What is your question?
    – Lawrence
    Mar 29 '21 at 17:14
  • Thank you Kate, I've been thinking it samely but I wanted to be sure. Because otherwise it can be unidiomatic like you said. Mar 29 '21 at 17:20
  • to ask someone in is an idiom that means to ask the person into a house, apartment, office or the place you are in.
    – Lambie
    Mar 29 '21 at 18:07
  • I think the example given in the question is an excellent and understandable way of (widely) separating the verbal phrase "ask in." It has a literary quality, even, and while it might not be common in speech, I could absolutely believe that someone might say something like, "I asked that lady working across the street in for a drink of water because it was so hot outside." In other words, more words than just a pronoun strikes me as believable, idiomatic speech.
    – user8356
    Mar 29 '21 at 19:52

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