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I wonder if "set" in the sentence below is used as an adjective modifying "patterns" or a past participle as in "have set". Or could it be interpreted in both ways?

We all have set patterns in life. We like to label ourselves as this or that and are quite proud of our opinions and beliefs. We all like to read a set newspaper, watch the same sorts of TV programs or movies, go to the same sort of stores every time, eat the sort of food that suits us, wear the same type of clothes.

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We all have set patterns in life. We like to label ourselves as this or that and are quite proud of our opinions and beliefs. We all like to read a set newspaper, watch the same sorts of TV programs or movies, go to the same sort of stores every time, eat the sort of food that suits us, [and] wear the same type of clothes.

The word set is an attributive adjective modifying the noun patterns.

An adjective like that is in fact a past participle, as explained below.

B. Past participles, usually ending in -ed or -en, are created from the form of a verb used with the verb to be as an auxiliary verb (passive voice).

Removing the auxiliary verb and using the -en form of the main verb as an adjective produces a past participle.

https://webapps.towson.edu/ows/verbals.aspx

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