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I’ve got this text:

In September it turned out that Judy won a scholarship that would cover her tuition and board. I was really glad for her because only a few students had this chance. Judy said she wanted to become more independent so this scholarship would be very helpful. I can understand her intention because it seems very embarrassing to spend money of someone who isn’t even your relative.

Now I’m struggling about whether I need to put the article before “money” in the last sentence. I’d rather not do it because there is no concrete relative or money, but a friend insists that the situation is concrete enough to put the article.

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    You might want to brush up on contractions: to spend someone's money when they are not even your relative.
    – Lambie
    Apr 11 at 20:02
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In September it turned out that Judy won a scholarship that would cover her tuition and board. I was really glad for her because only a few students had this chance. Judy said she wanted to become more independent so this scholarship would be very helpful. I can understand her intention because it seems very embarrassing to spend money of someone who isn’t even your relative.

Although the passage does not clearly name that someone in money of someone who isn’t even your relative, I tend to interpret that that person's identity is known. The noun phrase

someone who isn’t even your relative

with the intensifier, even, suggests that the potential benefactor has been identified, and a determiner could be required.

@Lambie's suggestion to use the possessive someone's should work well here.

https://grammar.collinsdictionary.com/easy-learning/nouns-used-without-a-determiner

Singular nouns that are uncountable are used without a determiner when you are making a general reference. Do you like jelly?

In our case here, I feel that the zero-determiner rule probably could not be applied.

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