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I started reading literature in English and often see sentences where ing-verb is without be. I met a sentence:

  • Stark's bodyguard spearheading the thing...

Can you tell me why there is no is here? So

  • Stark's bodyguard is spearheading the thing...

I would be happy to help.

I add a full offer: Well, I'm not sure I'm into the whole elitist vibe they've got going on. The mansion...Stark's bodyguard spearheading the thing..."

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The "ing" form has other uses: participles and gerunds.

This is a participle phrase, headed by the participle "spearheading" and functioning to modify the noun "bodyguard". As with many participle phrases, it can be rewritten as a relative clause

...Starks bodyguard that is spearheading the thing.

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Stark's bodyguard spearheading the thing

This is not a sentence, because it doesn't contain a verb. It's a fragment and a noun phrase. It doesn't stand alone here: it's presented as a sort of afterthought, to illustrate the "elitist vibe" the speaker mentioned. This is fairly common in spoken English. It could be more correctly expressed:

Well, I'm not sure I'm into the whole elitist vibe they've got going on, such as the mansion and stark's bodyguard spearheading the thing.

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