3

I've just encountered this title of BBC news page on Facebook and then looked for the meaning in the dictionary but I couldn't tell the meaning of it in this context.

enter image description here

5

It's a mistake. News articles don't begin with "But". Someone evidently thought it looked better with the headline below the article. Originally it may have looked like this:


UK virus infections back to September levels
But the World Health Organization warned that Covid cases around the world are continuing to increase at a "worrying rate".



When the text is arranged like this the word **But** makes sense. There is good news BUT there is also bad news.

(By the way, "warned" should be either "warns" or "has warned.")
1
  • 1
    This is a somewhat common way to comment on something on social media (or at least Twitter), but that doesn't really make sense for one's own content, especially not when sharing it for the first time. – NotThatGuy Apr 17 at 9:41

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.