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If I am trying to describe my experience today, which one of these is correct?

Every time I thought I got it, every time I made it to the point where I was sure I understood it, the market proves me wrong.

Or

Every time I thought I got it, every time I made it to the point where I was sure I understood it, the market proved me wrong.

Notes: I am convinced that the market will continue to prove me wrong in the future.

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    Okay, I think I should use present perfect instead: “The market has proven me wrong”. Correct? Apr 19 at 10:54
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    If you are describing an ongoing situation - "Every time I think I [have] got it, every time I make it to the point where i am sure I understand it, the market proves me wrong." Apr 19 at 11:59
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    Generally speaking, irregular verbs tend to slowly become regular. I must admit I'm surprised to discover that American English in particular seems to be primarily responsible for pushing the "irregular" verb form has proven into pole position (beating out has proved, which always used to be the more common version). To me, it sounds more like dialect (esp., Scottish) or "legalese", rather than a natural mainstream usage. Apr 19 at 13:28
  • I questioned the repetition of 'every time' more then the mixed tenses, but that wasn't your question which I think you have answered yourself Apr 19 at 15:34
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If it is universal truth then you can use present tense as subordinate clause with past tense as main clause

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The first sounds very informal about something that happened often in the past, but neither sentence is correct to describe your context of "my experience today".

Using all present tense is the most natural way to talk about this situation.

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