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As the record is/ will be out in June, please could you cancel my order

In this case as means because, shall I use present or future?

As the date of release is a fixed timetable so I would choose present, but as means because it is not a time clause so may be we can use future will

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  • It's in June. Either tense would be acceptable, but I think the future would be preferable. Apr 22 at 7:42
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In this particular context, either are acceptable. "Out" in the context of publishing can mean "released", so it refers to a specific point in time rather than a limited period.

In other contexts, saying something "is out" at a particular time can mean for a limited period. For example, if a person said "I'm out on Saturday", that would mean they are not home that day, but it could mean they are back home the following day. By contrast, when a record or a book "comes out", it is released to the public and is then continuously available from then on.

You could say any of the following:

  • The record is released in June
  • The record is out in June
  • The record will be released in June
  • The record will be out in June
  • The record will be available in/from June
  • The record will be available in/from June

The tense is fine, because there is a fixed date for the record release. You can say something "is coming" when it is in the process of coming and you are anticipating its arrival, for example "my brother is coming to visit in June".

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  • I agree with your answer, but disagree that "is coming" is related, because "is coming" is present continuous but "is released" is not. Present continuous for "is released" would be "is being released", which is another way to say "will be released" in the original context. "Is being out" doesn't work, though. You could say "is to be out", but that's awkward and not present continuous either.
    – Dan Getz
    Apr 22 at 11:15

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