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I tried to translate rather complicated nouns from my native language into English, then I wrote the following sentence:

I referred to some online dictionaries regarding the translations. If anyone thinks any translation can be expressed more accurately, I am more than happy to be corrected.

Is using I am more than happy correct here or should I say: I will be more than happy?

Both make sense to me in the sentence, this why I am a little confused as to which one I should use.

I was also wondering if don't hesitate to correct me can be used here.
As far I know, when we say don't we are usually addressing a specific person or people but I am not sure if I have encountered a case in which don't is used to address anyone.

Thank you for any guidance on this.

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    As far I know, when we say don't we are usually addressing a specific person or people but I am not sure if I have encountered a case in which don't is used to address anyone. - when we use don't in an imperative, it doesn't matter whether we're addressing a single known person or a specific group of people or everyone in general. For example, a common sign says "Do not walk on the grass". – stangdon Apr 22 at 15:30
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    That's my plan. And if you don't like it, leave now. That works fine with the unstated but implied subject you before the imperative leave now. But If we change the actual (initial) instance of you to anyone, the syntax seems a little "off" to me unless we change that imperative to a standard "assertion" with Subject + Verb - if anyone doesn't like it, they can leave now (or ...will they please leave now, or similar). That's to say, the relevant factor here is the presence of implied subject anyone, not the negating don't. – FumbleFingers Apr 22 at 15:46
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I agree with you that both are mostly correct in what you are trying to say.

I am more than happy to

means that you currently find it acceptable to do something, because it is in the present tense.

I would be more than happy to

means that you will still find it acceptable at a later date (such as when this is read), since it is in the past tense. Notice, here, that I changed I will to I would. Since this structure fragment is in the past tense, using will is a conflict since that word is used in the present tense.

In this particular occasion, I think it would be a matter of preference and intent. If you are verbally stating it, I would lean more towards using the present tense, but if you are making an online post, or written notice, then I would suggest using the past tense version.

I would also suggest you consider changing "If anyone thinks any translation...." to "If anyone feels that one of my translations..."

Don't hesitate to correct me can be used here but again this is more of a conversational thing. You are right that it can be directed at an individual or a group of people, however. (Also consider avoiding contractions like "don't" and use "do not" if using formal written form) Since you have written this, you might also consider using please feel free to send me any corrections or I would be more than happy to consider any corrections that you send me."

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