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I know my question is a little bit specific, but I would like the following sentence:

The function is not reliable with low sample size, but in this case a good estimate can be found by simulations.

I would like to know where should I put commas. Should I put the comma before but? after the word "case"? or at both places?

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  • 5
    The way you have it right now is exactly correct.
    – randomhead
    Commented Apr 24, 2021 at 19:47
  • Agreed. A comma after "case" is also an option, but not required.
    – gotube
    Commented Sep 28, 2021 at 17:29

1 Answer 1

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The function is not reliable with low sample size, but in this case a good estimate can be found by simulations.

To avoid a fused sentence, we place a comma before a coordinating conjunction.

Usually, we also set off parenthetical phrases with bracketing commas.

This example is made complicated by the presence of these two requirements, and we have to adjust our comma placement to comply with the stricter of the two rules.

This ensures a smoother sentence.

According to

http://www.sussex.ac.uk/informatics/punctuation/comma/bracketing

In many cases a weak interruption does not absolutely require bracketing commas.

The phrase 'in this case' in the example is a weak interruption, and we could omit the bracketing comma pair for it.

Your example is fine.

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  • And in the sentence "In many cases a weak interruption does not absolutely require bracketing commas.", "In many cases" is itself a weak interruption. Commented Apr 25, 2021 at 3:53

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