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The question is in the title - I know that "product" here serves as a plural, but it's hard to google how this situation is called in linguistics, and if there are any formal rules that could be learned to better understand and generalize this occurrence.

I heard it in a lesson recording and I couldn't formulate why it sounded so organic despite appearing to be incorrect - it was a reading of an article from some unspecified journal. Sorry for not providing the source, it's just rather awkward, as you can imagine.

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  • Please supply a real-life example, with its link IN the question, which is either taken from the net or a publication.
    – Mari-Lou A
    Apr 25 at 12:02
  • If there's only a single product being mass-produced, then maybe the singular could be used without the indefinite article (a/an)... but I would expect to see it as a title in a magazine article or in a newspaper. Articles are often omitted in headlines for reasons of space and for punchier titles.
    – Mari-Lou A
    Apr 25 at 12:05
  • @Mari-LouA Thank you that's exactly right! I heard it in a lesson recording and I couldn't formulate why it sounded so organic despite appearing to be incorrect - it was a reading of an article from some unspecified journal, and they do indeed do that. Sorry for not providing the source, it's just rather awkward, you can imagine. Apr 25 at 12:41
  • Definition of "product" - mass noun Commercially manufactured articles, especially recordings, viewed collectively. ‘They succeeded by manufacturing commercially viable product that people found beneficial to their lives.’
    – ColleenV
    Apr 25 at 14:41
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It's marketing-speak (or perhaps production-engineering-speak) to use product as a mass noun.

See for example sense 1 here. It's not marked as jargon, but I don't think many people would use it that way in ordinary conversation.

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