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I know I can use these modal verbs when talking to a specific person, but I am wondering if I can use all these three modal verbs with a generic subject "you" or "people".

  1. Working in London next summer could be a great experience.

  2. Working in London next summer might be a great experience.

  3. Working in London next summer will be a great experience.

Do they all work with a generic subject "you" or "people". For example:

a) Your working in London...

b) People's working in London...

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    I don't get what you mean by generic subject. This would be naturally be directed at a person, and refer to the that person. It's not generic, it's specific. – James K Apr 27 at 17:08
  • For some reason known to the speaker, they believe that for anyone/people to work in London next summer will/might/could be a great experience, referring to people in general. In another context, the speaker believes that for him to work in London next summer will/might/could be a great experience, referring to his friend. Are these two sentences correct? – Mr. X Apr 27 at 17:35
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    People's working doesn't feel right to me, though I can't exactly say why. I'd prefer For [people] to work in London... or Working in London next summer could be a great experience for [people]. – Kate Bunting Apr 28 at 8:54
  • @KateBunting, Thank you! – Mr. X Apr 28 at 10:24

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