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is it possible to use for a few days with present simple : I read in a movie with subtitles for a few days I miss the cat, should it be I've missed the cat for a few days if it is ongoing situation or recently finished or I missed the cat for a few days if it belongs to the past

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  • What movie? What was the context? "For a few days, I miss the cat" looks very odd but perhaps there is context that makes it work.
    – James K
    Apr 29 at 21:37
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The present simple for verbs that aren't "stative" verbs has a "narration" effect - you'd use this tense if you were recording actions in a log or describing what someone is doing in real time.

A device someone might use when recounting past events is to pretend we have gone back in time. If we identify a past point in time, and then we use present as though "now" is that past point in time, we pull the reader into a story of recounted events.

Ok, I'll tell you how this all began. It started on the first day of May in 2010. I wake up that morning, I eat breakfast, and suddenly I hear a knock on the door. When I open the door, I see an old lady there, and she says her name is Margaret.

So we may pull the reader back to a time in the past in this fashion, and want to describe events that occur over a longer period of time. "For a few days {present simple}" works here.

Ok, I'll tell you how this all began. It started on the first day of May in 2010. I wake up that morning, I eat breakfast, and suddenly I hear a knock on the door. When I open the door, I see an old lady there, and she says her name is Margaret. She tells me she lost her cat and asks if I saw the cat anywhere. I tell her no. For a few days I look everywhere for the cat, but her pet was nowhere to be found.

Outside of this, it likely won't work though.

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