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https://voca.ro/1jeSBpuxHA4c

I've had a weird journey learning English. Having grown up in Canada, I learned English before I learned my own native language. Once I moved back to the country from which my parents are originally from, my Canadian accent was totally lost. I moved back to Canada two years ago and have been having difficulty with my accent. I have attempted to learn how to pronounce all vowels and constants and I have also tried shadowing but I am still far from a native English speaker.

https://voca.ro/1kHNEYCwH5HW

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    This is an off-topic question for ELL. – FeliniusRex May 3 at 20:45
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    Give yourself more credit: your accent is not bad at all! I couldn't disagree more with @Kentaro's comment: I had no trouble at all understanding you. Now, of course there are things you could improve, but I hope you don't feel like your accent is a major obstacle to communication. It isn't, at least to my ear. – TypeIA May 3 at 20:45
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    It's not off topic at all. When did the pronunciation of English become off topic? I'm not a native speaker unlike @TypelA so that I said cruel thing but coming out like this deserved at least a vote. (IMO). – Kentaro May 3 at 20:48
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    @Lambie Turn your volume up. That's a technical issue, not a linguistic issue. (Yes, the recording is quiet.) – TypeIA May 3 at 21:17
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    @Kentaro wrote "it is very difficult to catch even a word". Nonsense. Possibly spiteful. Ali, you speak very clearly. I do agree with Lambie, though. You are speaking like you are in church, and in a bit of a monotone. You need to 'produce' your voice more, but there is nothing wrong with either your accent or pronunciation. You do not sound like a native speaker (although I can hear Canada) but if you are remaining in Canada just stay with it. Practice conversation, watch TV news (especially interviews with members of the public). – Michael Harvey May 3 at 21:38
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Here are some thoughts, in no particular order. I can't really offer any strong suggestions on what you should focus on first or what's most important, but here are the things I noticed after listening.

  • You over-enunciate some consonants, and under-enunciate others. Your /t/s are sometimes too crisp and sharp. On the other hand your /d/ in "understand" is almost inaudible.

  • You seem to muddle through some words, like when you say "like, is it my rhythm ..." this should be six distinct syllables, but the /ɪ/s seem to disappear and the consonants blend together.

  • Some of your vowel tones and lengths are off. (On the other hand, some of them are perfect.) Example: the /ʌ/ ("uhh" sound) in "... something [else]?" is too deep and too long. This is the kind of nuance that can take decades to master, and many people beyond a certain age simply never can. That's okay! I'm a foreign language learner & expatriate myself, and I've accepted the fact that I'll very probably never master nuances like this and will always have an "American accent."

Give yourself more credit: your accent is not bad at all! I couldn't disagree more with the comment saying you were hard to understand: I had no trouble at all understanding you. Now, of course there are things you could improve, but I hope you don't feel like your accent is a major obstacle to communication. It isn't, at least to my ear!

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    Even though the sound ain't great, I feel that you are going overboard here. – Lambie May 3 at 21:21
  • @Lambie Can you expand on that? Do you think this person doesn't deserve an answer for some reason, that the points I raised are incorrect, or that the explanations need improvement? I'm happy to incorporate constructive feedback. – TypeIA May 4 at 7:05

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