0
  • The lectures are conducted in English.
  • The lectures are delivered in English.

Are above sentences correct and natural? Are there alternative ways to express the same idea? I intended that the sentences mean "The lectures take place in a way that the professor and students use English to study.".

1
  • 1
    As you can see from this NGram usage chart, both verbs are about equally common. Use whichever you like best - there's no scope for your choice to make any difference to the meaning. I'm afraid your The lectures take place in a way that the professor and students use English to study is invalid and probably meaningless. All the main two assertions mean is the lecturer (and any students raising queries) spoke in English. May 4, 2021 at 16:00

1 Answer 1

1
  • The lectures are in English.

  • The lectures are given in English.

  • The lectures are taught in English.

I think "conducted" one is also fine.

2
  • 1
    I don't understand why you would endorse given but not delivered, which has the same meaning. May 4, 2021 at 5:55
  • That can also be OK.
    – Jawel7
    May 4, 2021 at 6:08

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .