-1

idealistic vs ideal 1.He thinks they’re extremely idealistic, for all their pragmatism. 2.He thinks they’re extremely ideal, for all their pragmatism.

6
  • Have you looked up both words in the dictionary? May 8, 2021 at 11:10
  • #1 comments on their ethics. #2 says they are a good selection, based on some undefined criteria. The two sentences have completely different meanings.
    – PcMan
    May 8, 2021 at 11:11
  • @KateBunting yes, and the key to this question is ideal, which I don’t understand why. i think both are fine.
    – user112563
    May 8, 2021 at 11:17
  • So it depends on what you want to say. May 8, 2021 at 11:19
  • @PcMan i know that the two sentences are completely different, but i am not so sure which one is more natural/common/reasonable.
    – user112563
    May 8, 2021 at 11:21

1 Answer 1

0

First of all, some grammar corrections are needed in your sentences. You shouldn't use a comma to set off "for all their pragmatism" because it modifies the main verb "be(are)" there.

The corrected ones are:

1.He thinks they’re extremely idealistic for all their pragmatism.

2.He thinks they’re extremely ideal for all their pragmatism.

The first sentence means:

They are extremely idealistic for all their pragmatism, so they are doing everything for their own ideology and are ready, eager, willing to sacrifice so many things and even their life. So, they are idealistic.

The second sentence means:

They are extremely ideal for all their pragmatism, so they are better than the others working for the same ideology and every ideology needs these kinds of people who are hard-working. They are really good choices for the success, plans and road map of the ideology.

That's what I understood from the two.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .