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I am reading a Composition, which was titled as

Describe a time when you were given a chance to remedy a situation which had gone wrong.

I understand it as even the remedy also had gone wrong.

If I keep comma after situation whether it means remedy also went wrong?

Describe a time when you were given a chance to remedy a situation, which had gone wrong.

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    in both cases, the situation had gone wrong but your remedy has not. May 10 '21 at 10:41
  • @flumperious thanks. how to say to mean that the remedy went wrong? with minimal changes to the sentence?
    – Rachayita
    May 10 '21 at 10:44
  • not entirely the same, but "Describe a time when you tried to fix a problem but made it worse" would be the way I would say it May 10 '21 at 10:46
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    if you want to keep the sentence similar, "Describe a time when you tried and failed to remedy a situation which had gone wrong". I would also drop the "which had gone wrong", as that is implied May 10 '21 at 10:47
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The past perfect in the relative clause ("had gone wrong") indicates that something went wrong before the main event being described. So the only possible interpretation here is that the situation had gone wrong before your attempt to remedy it.

If you want to refer to the larger context (when you were given a chance to remedy...), in this instance the most clear and natural-sounding way would be to refer to that with "it", and conjoin another independent clause (using the simple past tense).

"Describe a time when you were given a chance to remedy a situation, but it went wrong."

(You can use "and" or "but" here but "but" works better)

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There is no indication in any of the 2 examples that even the remedy had gone wrong. Having a comma after situation does not change much to the meaning of the clause.

Describe a time when you were given a chance to remedy a situation, which had gone wrong.

With the comma, the relative clause is non-defining and, in informal use, a non-defining relative clause is sometimes used to modify an entire clause.

Cambridge Dictionary

If we are allowed to explore informal use, there could be a solution.

In our case here, as which had gone wrong describes a prior situation, it is unable to modify when you were given a chance to remedy a situation to make the remedy go wrong too.

If the non-defining relative clause uses went as its verb, it could be interpreted in informal use as modifying when you were given a chance to remedy a situation.

Describe a time when you were given a chance to remedy a situation, which went wrong.

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