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Here are two sentences:

  1. He deeply appreciated art.

  2. He had a deep appreciation of art.

What are the differences between the two sentences — more specifically, between "deeply appreciate" and "had a deep appreciation"? Does one give more emphasis than the other? Or are the differences too small and subtle to fuss over?

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    i don't see any difference in the import of the two sentences. Commented May 14, 2021 at 6:02
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    The first one is correct and the second is nearly correct as an alternative. We do not have an appreciation for something but an appreciation of something. We can have love or affection for something (without an indefinite article) and a love of something but the use of an article turns the emotion into a noun and that takes of not for. Your second example should be "He had a deep appreciation of art" or "He had deep appreciation for art" although the last one is much less common.
    – BoldBen
    Commented May 14, 2021 at 6:03
  • @BoldBen I dunno, appreciation for seems to be getting more and more common all the time: books.google.com/ngrams/…
    – stangdon
    Commented May 14, 2021 at 11:45

1 Answer 1

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He deeply appreciated art. He had a deep appreciation of art. What are the differences between the two sentences — more specifically, between "deeply appreciate" and "had a deep appreciation"? Does one give more emphasis than the other? Or are the differences too small and subtle to fuss over?

These sentences indicate the same meaning. I wouldn’t worry about it, they both sound correct! :)

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