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I read this sentence in a story:

"Could you come with me a moment, Joe," she said."

As a learner of English I would write this sentences as:

"Could you come with me FOR a moment, Joe," she said.

Is it right to use "for"? Why hasn't the writer used "for"? Does it change the meaning?

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    It is casual speech and does not change the meaning.
    – randomhead
    Commented May 15, 2021 at 17:29
  • Could you please come with me [for] a moment. It is spoken language and the for is left out. Either one is fine.
    – Lambie
    Commented May 16, 2021 at 16:21
  • @Lambie thanks for the correction. I am a learner of English and do make mistakes.
    – Learner
    Commented May 16, 2021 at 17:48
  • You can say English learner. :)
    – Lambie
    Commented May 16, 2021 at 17:54
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    @Lambie Seriously... this is a site for English learners. Your comment comes across very critical and unwelcoming. A bit of tolerance for imperfect grammar is a completely reasonable expectation here.
    – TypeIA
    Commented May 16, 2021 at 17:56

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That is an example of casual language, but I don’t see it much in America. It might be something written from a while ago or could be British English. The meaning is the same though!

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