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Could you tell me if there is any difference between read something to someone and read something out to someone? For example:

Sir, I can read your PUK code to you only after you've been identified.

Sir, I can read your PUK code out to you only after you've been identified.

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There is no practical difference. Wiktionary has:

read, verb.
2. (transitive or intransitive) To speak aloud words or other information that is written. Often construed with a to phrase or an indirect object.
Synonym: read aloud, read out, read out loud, speak

The definition for "read out" mentions that it is used specifically when the information is being read aloud for the benefit of another, instead of (for example) someone reading lines of a play out loud to rehearse them with no one else around. But in your example "read" already has that connotation by using "to."

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    You would read a story to a child, but read out an item of information. May 17 '21 at 16:25
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"Read out to someone" would not be correct. In common usage a computer can have a "read out," but a person can not. So in your examples:

"Sir, I can read your PUK code to you only after you've been identified." is the only correct one.

However, it would also be correct and have the same meaning to alter the statement as:

"Sir, I can read your PUK code out loud to you only after you've been identified."

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    Most of the answer is incorrect. "Read out" is a common phrasal verb which simply means "read aloud". You seem to be referring to a "readout" (a single-word noun), which is something different entirely. A readout is not limited to a computer, however, a person can provide a readout as well as a machine. May 17 '21 at 16:00

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