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Let's say someone sent me a link to an article that discussed a certain topic and I liked that topic so much I couldn't get enough of it and I just kept reading one article after another until I was hooked.
That link, for example, was also the reason I bumped into other interesting things that I might have never seen if it wasn't for it.

Is there an idiom for this, similar to:
"This made me step into a new world"?

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    the reason I came across other interesting things. One usually only bumps into people or things. :)
    – Lambie
    May 20, 2021 at 21:35

3 Answers 3

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I think the idiom you are looking for is "it opened up a whole new world to me".

"Made me step into..." sounds like you were forced to do something. In fact they just "opened up", or 'revealed' something which you had not seen before and which appealed to you.

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  • step into, enter, go into a new world. Why not? They are idiomatic.
    – Lambie
    May 20, 2021 at 21:35
  • @lambie Read my answer again, it's only brief, I can't believe you missed this. In isolation, I agree, they are fine. But you've omitted the leading "made me...". To say it "made me step into a new world" sounds like it forced you into the new world. That's not normally how this is used. Something reveals, or opens up a new world, and then you choose to step into it.
    – Astralbee
    May 20, 2021 at 21:54
  • Yes, and no, make is not physical force always: The article made me think, it made me step into a new world. I think it's okay. In a sense, learning something new can make you see something new.
    – Lambie
    May 20, 2021 at 22:09
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If you want to emphasize the interesting things you've learned, and how glad you are to have learned them, then I'd agree with @Astralbee's answer.

If you want to emphasize the amount of time you spent reading, or the amount of articles you read, or the large number of interesting facts you've learned, than I would personally use the idiom "fell down the rabbit hole" or "led me down a rabbit hole".

For example, "I went online to find a good sushi restaurant, but that just led me down a rabbit hole of Japanese culinary history."

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  • Use of "down a rabbit hole" often has negative connotations, though. It suggests that it is a complicated labyrinth, difficult to negotiate, something that you can't easily find your way out of. I don't think that is what the OP wants to convey.
    – Astralbee
    May 20, 2021 at 22:00
  • See, I guess the idiom doesn't have negative connotations for me, besides maybe the fact that you wasted your time lol. But I guess idioms don't really have super concrete definitions, so I appreciate your perspective. May 20, 2021 at 22:22
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When you're exposed to a new idea that broadens your understanding, we often say:

"It opened my eyes."

As in, you've been walking around blind without even knowing it- And now the world is so much bigger than you thought.

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