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In the following sentence, I want to know what the bold part refers to. Is it a participle phrase or participle clause? And the reason behind it.

Being the earliest well-known example of a financial bubble, the term 'tulip mania' is sometimes used to refer to similar situations, such as the Bitcoin bubble of 2017.

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    And what do you think it is? Try to think in respect of phrase and clause structure. And in your question please include what you think about it. Thanks. Commented May 20, 2021 at 0:40

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You can use "phrase" or "clause".

It is a participle phrase/clause, and it describes "tulip mania". I don't really see any difference in the words "clause" and "phrase" when the "verb" is actually a participle. You can call it a non-finite clause, or you can call it a phrase, and both terms are used, as illustrated those links.

We could understand this as

Tulip mania was the earliest well-known example of a financial bubble, and so the term 'tulip mania' is sometimes used to refer to similar situations...

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  • It's a clause with its own implied subject and predicate. Commented May 19, 2021 at 23:39
  • It's a non-finite clause consisting of just the predicate verb phrase. We usually talk of the highest constituent in the structure, so "clause" is preferable".
    – BillJ
    Commented May 20, 2021 at 6:23

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