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Situation 1, the boy and his mom are at home. Mom saw a broken glass on the floor and she wanted the boy to come to her.

Do we say "the mom called the boy over" and "the mom called out to the boy" in the situation 1?

Situation 2, mom twisted her ankle and she wanted the boy to come to her.

Do we say "the mom called the boy over" and "the mom called out to the boy" in the situation 2?

What is the difference between "the mom called the boy over" and "the mom called out to the boy"?

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    "Call out" and "call over" are both phrases that could be looked up in a dictionary.
    – Astralbee
    Jun 10 at 8:12
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You call someone over to tell them to come to you, using words like 'Come here!'. If you call out to someone you could be saying anything at all.

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"The mom called the boy over" means that she quite literally called the boy over to her with her voice, and he presumably came over to her. "The mom called out to the boy" is similar, but it means that she spoke up more loud and forcefully to be heard, and it doesn't necessarily mean he listened or responded. But like the other commenter said, it can mean many things depending on how it is used, but these are some general examples.

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As I understand it, when you call someone over, you want them to (primarily) come to the physical location that you are calling them from while when you call out to someone you want to grab their attention. Assuming this is the case, in Situation 1, I would say the mom called the boy over while in the Situation 2, I would say the mom called out to the boy.

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